CSS

CSS3 Grayscale Filter

I stumbled upon a quick video on YouTube on how to use the CSS3 grayscale filter when hovering on an image.

The results can be seen via this Codepen CSS3 Grayscale Filter

Click on the CSS tab in the Codepen example above to see how this filter effect can be implemented in your CSS.

“Method of applying filter effects (like blur, grayscale, brightness, contrast and hue) to elements, previously only possible by using SVG.” – Can I Use

“It’s worth noting that right now, CSS Filter Effects are an unoffical specification – however, the editors of the spec include representatives from Adobe, Apple and Opera, and we have already got implementations in Chrome, Safari and iOS 6.” – CSS3 Filters

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CSS, Preprocessor

Preprocessing is for Everybody

Preprocessing is for Everybody by Chris Coyier

“You’ve heard about CSS preprocessors. If you have yet to take the dive or have only dipped your toes in, let Chris Coyier (CSS-Tricks, Codepen) convince you that you won’t regret it. Have you met resistance? Let’s try and convince your boss and colleagues. There may be some misconceptions going around that we need to nip in the bud. Then we’ll look at how preprocessors fit into the modern web development workflow, the evolving best practices for using them, and how to squeeze out all the benefit we can get from them.” – An Event Apart Video

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CSS, Preprocessor, Sass

Features of Compass

“Compass is an open-source CSS Authoring Framework.” – Compass

“Compass can do some really handy tasks like measuring images from the filesystem and writing them into your stylesheets. Asset URL functions are available that make it easy to move assets around in a project or even switch to a content delivery network (CDN) without having to rewrite your stylesheets. Compass can even combine a directory of images into a single sprite image and do the otherwise tedious task of calculating coordinates and writing the spriting CSS for you.” – Sass and Compass in Action (Manning)

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CSS, Sass

Learning Sass

What is Sass?

“Sass is a meta-language on top of CSS that’s used to describe the style of a document cleanly and structurally, with more power than flat CSS allows. Sass both provides a simpler, more elegant syntax for CSS and implements various features that are useful for creating manageable stylesheets.” – Sass

To install Sass, read the official Sass guide or if you’re trying to install Sass at your workplace and have issues due to your network firewall, read my previous blog post.

There are numerous ways to compile Sass. There’s the Command Line/Terminal or GUI’s such as Koala, Scout, Prepos and Codekit. Read the official Sass guide on the best way to compile your Sass to CSS.

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Sass, Workflow Tools

Sass, Command Line and a Firewall

After a year off from work (I was on maternity leave) I’m finally getting a chance to catch up on what I’ve missed from the Web Development community. One of which is CSS Preprocessors which has been around for a few years now. I won’t go into the details to describe what it is so I’ve listed a few popular and most used CSS Preprocessors.

After reading about CSS Preprocessors I’ve decided to explore and experiment with Sass based on these reasons:

“Sass makes it easier to write less CSS codes and manipulate them dynamically. It’s a great way to write more functional CSS codes and can speed up the workflow of every web developer and designer” – from 1st Web Designer

“It’s a way to simplify your CSS workflow, making development and maintenance tasks easier. For instance, have you ever had to do a find-and-replace in your stylesheet to change a particular HEX color for a particular indecisive client? Or had to open up the calculator app to figure out a column width in a multi-column design? Sass introduces new concepts such as variables, mixins, nestings and selector inheritance” – from Treehouse Blog

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